About your Search

20130318
20130326
SHOW
Book TV 27
Today 8
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 147
SFGTV 118
MSNBCW 74
CSPAN 66
CSPAN2 63
FBC 55
CNNW 48
KGO (ABC) 30
CNBC 29
KNTV (NBC) 19
KQED (PBS) 19
CURRENT 18
KRCB (PBS) 15
KTVU (FOX) 15
KPIX (CBS) 14
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 865
Search Results 200 to 249 of about 867 (some duplicates have been removed)
that his dream and his words and the education that we have from dr. king stays alive for generations to come. so, this is truly an amazing event today. dr. king in 1967 asked, where do we go from here? and today we're still asking that same question. where do we go from here? well, we still have people suffering in our community, people in the african-american community. where do we go from here when we have lost numbers of african americans in san francisco? where do we go from here? well, i'll tell you where we go from here. (applause) >> we change policy of the city. we change policy, and we start to be progressive, truly progressive about the policies we push to make african americans feel welcomed in this city. so, where do we go from here? we start to make aggressive efforts to educate our young people. we take ownership of our community. we take ownership of our children. we support each other instead of pointing the finger. where do we go from here? (applause) >> there is much work to do. as supervisor cohen and i cannot do it alone, we need your support. we need your encoura
the public education system based on the progressive theories of john dewey. the compatriots' railed against the memorization and that children should read and write and do sums on their own timetable and that was even harmful to force them to do it faster. she believed their emotional development was as important as their intellectual development and she said that most important thing that a school could do is get children into the habit of being happy. most importantly, she believed come and her fellow progressive educators believed that a school must instill in children's minds the ability to think independently so that they could participate fully in the american democracy. in 1932, he elizabeth irwin's class's or at p.s. 41 which most of you probably know is on west 11th street, and it still is in the village. the city at that point withdrew its funding from the experiment and the parents were so upset that their children wouldn't be able to take class with elizabeth warren that they banded together and something that's famous at a parent's ice cream parlor they got together the money o
for no. 2 and this is the third or fourth year in a row that the quality of public education came out no. 2 and i think when people talk about small business issue, they don't think about that one. no. 3, no surprise, regulations. no. 4, taxation. no. 5, this is another one that i find can kind of interesting. last year it was actually no. 4, but infrastructure. small businesses are concerned about infrastructure, and it's been borne out again by the survey. as far as some of the interesting specifics of the respondents, 48% provide health insurance, 52% did not provide health insurance. interestingly enough and maybe i will talk a little bit more, 74% almost had never heard of the small business tax credit. 63% had never talked to their state senator. their assembly person or to the governor, which i think is a little scary and it's something that hopefully you as a commissioner will re[tpo-rpbs/] that we reinforce to our representatives. those who did need capital 2:1 and those who couldn't get capital versus those who can't get capital. so it's clearly a problem for those who need i
of phoenix and other for-profit educational institutions, reported a 79% drop due to lower enrollment. the stock was the biggest gainer in the s&p today, up more than 7%. coming up, we'll look at why some college graduates are having trouble with education debt and what some schools are doing about it. >> and alsoñuf still ahead, the supreme court hears a case that touches the wallet and the medicine cabinets of moat americans. first take a look at how the international markets finished the day. >>> some good news about prices at the pump. average gasoline prices fell a little more than 3 cents a gallon to $3.71 nationwide. the city with the highest average price in the lower 48 states? see if you can guess. chicago, $4.10. lowest average price just $3.33 a gallon is in montana. >> just days after the senate passed its first budget in four years, bill dudley, president of the federal reserve bank in new york, told -- >> this may not immediately lead to stronger growth because of the recent increase in fiscal restraint. >> also washington today, the supreme court hearing arguments in
in order to get this. we are educated people with means. and resources. it's that difficult for us. the system is broken. not only that, if the high-tech companies really want to fulfill the jobs they have, that they say, however there are, 80,000 that microsoft put out the other day, that in the industry they don't have enough engineers, they are not going to be able to get that bill passed through this congress. thinking pragmatic i. will they won't get it done without a comprehensive piece. what rand paul did today is maybe he disappointed a lot of people in love with him last week. but i think the good thing about him is he has true core beliefs. there is a lot worse that you could have in washington today. >> andrea: i do doubt that the republican party will be able to pull the voters in the party. but from right thing to do perspective, i feel like is it the right thing to do. maybe that's just because of my father's story and i see how hard he worked. i do see that there is dependency issues. i get that with every gender and ethnicity. i get that. everybody is susceptible to
. >> the bright orange color of prison jump suits, how it's being used in the latest battle over education funding here in california. morning, brian! love your passat! um. listen, gary. i bought the last one. nice try. says right here you can get one for $199 a month. you can't believe the lame-stream media, gary. they're all gone. maybe i'll get one. [ male announcer ] now everyone's going to want one. you can't have the same car as me, gary! i'm gettin' one. nope! [ male announcer ] volkswagen springtoberfest is here and there's no better time to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. right now lease one of four volkswagen models for under $200 a month. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> new at 10:00, a proposal for dramatic change in how california funds public education. a group of supporters rallied behind the governor. they used costumes to make a point. >> reporter: julie, they did. they correspondenced up as prisoners, and tied these orange bands, saying change, not chains around supporters arms. they say it's time for california to reverse the trend of spending more on prisons
billion in one year. we spend about $100 billion on education. we spend about $40 billion-plus, a little over, on highways, roads and bridges. that's just an example. we are now surging from 200, 250 in interest to 800 in interest as a result of the accounting that c.b.o. has provided us if we follow this path. it's going to crowd out spending for research. it's going to crowd out spending for children, education, health care and any other program this government wishes to undertake, including defense. mr. president, what kind of time limit might i inquire? is it 30 minutes on this side on this motion? the presiding officer: on the motion, there is one hour equally divided. would the senator like to call up his motion? mr. sessions: my first question would be how much time is left on my half of that hour? the presiding officer: the motion has not yet been called. mr. sessions: well, i would call up the motion, mr. president. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: the senator from alabama, mr. sessions, moves to recommit senate concurrent resolution 8 back to
and to get an education and get a good job, to worship got in their own way, to get married, to raise a family. the same is true of those young palestinians i met with this morning. the same is true for young palestinians who yearn for a better life in gaza. that's where peace begins. not just in the plans of leaders but in the hearts of people. not just in some carefully designed process, but in the daily connections, that sense of empathy that takes place among those who live together in this land and in this sacred city of jerusalem. and let me say this as a politician. i can promise you this. political leaders will never take risks if the people do not push them to take some risks. you must create the change that you want to see. ordinary people can accomplish extraordinary things. i know this is possible. look to the bridges being built in business in civil society by some of you here today. look at the young people who have not yet learned a reason to mistrust or those young people who have learned to overcome a legacy of mistrust that they inherited from their parents. because
with our financial ostentations to educate consumers about the new value proposition that this will bring. though idea is to make shopping easier. fully convergent, both for remote transactions and processing transactions. tracy: what does this mean in the terms that we may buy a loaf of bread at the grocery store. >> our vision is that with your phone you will be doing a tap and pay at a physical location and when you will want to make a payment over your phone you well not have to enter your 16 digit number but you simply have to enter a log and password. tracy: what about security? that is a number one concern for consumers. the mastercard brand, do you think, give you an advantage or a level of assurance that some of these other companies cannot provide. >> very much so. as a consumer you have all the benefits the you enjoy today. and we're going to introduce a security features in this digital devices. tracy: and the last thing, some of your competitors, visa and discover have recently said they will not charge any sort of fee on digital wallets, companies like paypall and even ebay
themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with you, doctor. >> i would punt that one right over to david who is the expert in free will, and then we actually spent all last night debating this. david can start. >> ok. >> do you consciously choose to do that? [laughter] >> i think that free will is a mainly unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional
with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robust community real estate finance unit. next, we have the ceo of ne community federal credit union. since 1988, she has been the ceo of northwest community federal credit union. under her watch, the credit union group to over 1600 members. it has become the national model for institutions seeking to provide financial education and banking services to the low- income communities. last but not least, we have our conditional lender represented here by wells fargo. mark cyrus is the senior fda banker for the region -- the senior sba banker. he held businesses choose the best loans for the growing business and focus on a comprehensive understanding of their goals for their business. mark is responsible for helping entrepreneurs with sba loans every step of the way. i would like each of you to speak a little bit about w
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
is some bigger space and some room for doing actual education. so, we have made it this far and we have more to do after this and we just are hopeful that you will also see that this is a good use of a public building for many people. thank you. >> thank you. >>> questions? >> there may be questions for you later. thank you. opening up for public comment, timothy thin, steve griffin, john goldman, kathleen mull duffin, and kathrin nemeth. >>> hello, thank you for letting me speak. my name is tim thin. i've lived down the street from the church for 25 years. they've been an excellent neighbor and did a good job of reaching out to the neighborhood on their previous project. i have consulted with a number of neighbors who could not be here tonight. their main concern is actually the traffic situation. the change of child care facility from 15 to 45 kids is tripling the capacity of that facy. there is no parking, there is no loading zone. and, you know, it's changing the church from a church to a day care center to a school. and as i understand there is no staff to manage the drop-offs and
programs through her church. [speaker not understood] received her education from oakwood college and california university where she obtained a master's degree in psychology. ms.felder started in the city as a clerk with child crisis and worked her way up to management, to the management level and is now the director of the city's integrated response system. she has demonstrated exemplary leadership, administratively and in the field. she is well loved by her staff as you can tell, and lead her staff by example, working with a team and not above them. she has a hands-on -- she's a hand on manager who doesn't just sit behind her desk, but works closely with her team. and directly with victims and their loved ones. she believes that mental health services need to be brought directly to communities. she is proactive in setting her team to neighborhoods with the greatest need for behavioral health services to engage the community through activities and to build the relationships and trust so that those who may need services and support can be more open to seek the help that they need
the tagging. >> you just have to educate them. try to make them aware of what's gang graffiti and what's tagger graffiti. either way it's going to be dangerous. there is a lot of violence in the taggers. they get into fist fights. i've arrested tagers with knives and brass knuckles. i've heard stories of guns being taken off tagers. it is a violent culture or has aspects of violent culture in it. you need to educate people on that. when you're going -- when you're painting over someone's graffiti, that could be seen as the ultimate disrespect. and you could be exposing yourself to a lot of danger. that's one of the reasons why we have officers going out with juveniles. now, the good thing about doing paint overs is it's not a signature. that's a blanket of paint covering graffiti. so, thor just going to know that i directed them to do that. and they can, they can address me if they have any problems with the fact that i told somebody to paint over them. you know, i'm not putting a tag there. it's city property. and as far as the type of paint we use, we don't use aerosol paint. we don'
. that is probably not fair. some will get jobs because your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hack education. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just want comic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell me your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their educatn one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year what is the big loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professo
... "we know that drinking has a lot to do with spring break so we try to educate the campus as much as we can in order to make sure that they are safe." this past september, cal poly student brett olson died as a result of excessive drinking... he was attending the chico float, a notorious annual event for college students..." authorites say sometimes some students don't make it back from spring break because of irresponsible decisions and they say don't become one of those statistics... in san jose, tiffani tofani, update news. a longtime, loved professor at san jose state has passed. update news reporter ingrid almarez attended his memorial. ">>>natso family, friends, and colleagues gathered at the spartan memorial chapel to remember the life of retired political science professor ted norton, who passed away at the age of ninety on february 7th. his journey at san jose state started in 1960. nortons nephew, steve rule, says since then sjsu was his uncles home. i really now as i get to know the situation better and hear the kind things that were said about him today is just i realize tha
the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] israelis understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. economicit has led to growth and progress. solar power, electric cars, synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they should look at tel aviv, home of research centers and startups. [applause] israelis are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. today the trade between our two countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is the kind of relationship israel should have an
of the and he calls it inform the see that education, he is not alone in this they're saying the same thing that we suspend our efforts teaching people how to find stuff for information on the internet it is different from knowing things. the fight took all the electricity away we have a blackout i said if your devices don't work what do you know, ? they will say not much because i need to be able to find things it is published last year that if you ask people to do a google search than later ask them what they found, there better remembering how they followed the search path they're remembering the contents. so these technologies, plus kugel maybe i could live without it but it is redefining what it means to no. not just because of technology but people in education say we should learn how to use these. we are raising a generation of people to believe it is not what you know, or how you analyze the argument or who you are but that worries me incredibly. >> host: what is your view on the pbs? >> guest: some faculty members say over my dead body to use wikipedia it is a fascinating experime
political group focusing on issues important to the tech community like immigration and education reform, zuckerberg reportedly ready to spend $20 million on the venture including a bipartisan group of consultants. at the rosewood hotel in menlo park, back to you. >> emily, thank you so much. >> feel like having chocolate? >> you've known me for years. i always do. >> in belguim all have you to do is send a letter. >> the country released stamp that's smell, look and smell like chocolates. >> perfumed stamps have been made in the past. this is the first time they're able to taste the flavor when licking the back of the stamps. there is an idea. that is what they need. >> it's a good idea. >> that is the best chocolate in the world. no rain and cool for spring but it's feeling good out there. here is a a look out there. we've got temperatures down a little bit but no rain threatening us in the forecast future. just north we have a wide area of scattered moisture. you can see that maybe you can't see this, but much of this is not hitting the ground. there is a slight chance of showers thur
. they have an effort to balance their budget and they are cutting aid to higher education. sometimes up to 75% cuts in one year. 75% of students attend public universities. that is where this is happening. what the government is attempting to do is slightly decreased the amount of money they are making off of these students, going from 16% to 11% in fees. they do want to ensure that students are paying back something every month. so that we are preventing the cycle of default which benefits everybody in this process. allowing students were not able to get a job. really predatory loans, interest rates that are higher, refinancing to pay off over time. >> i think one of the biggest problem is that we need to increase the qualifications for loans. we need to make it more academics we see students getting into the university system. not everyone benefits from a college education. neil: high school seniors, for example, breaking out. >> is if they are able to thrive in a college environment and their background. we have to make sure that we're putting those students through college. we don't want
will get jobs because of your education but many will pay $200,000 and get little more than that. this is why dale stephens dropped out and has the web site uncollege.org and his book hackeducatn. what do you mean? there is a reason people go to college. >> that is what society says you need to do but that means you have to learn what they tell you the not what you want to interest you. john: i just wan cic books and girls i wouldn't have learned anything. >> maybe you start a comic book about girls. [laughter] >> you tell m your doing better? >> there is a community around the world who is actively doing creative things with their education one dropped out now is an artist and getting commissions. summer building solar powered computers but without paying the high cost of college. i did not go to middle school or high school. john: your parents let you leave school? >> they were not fans of the idea but i thought if i leave for one year wh is the bi loss? if i go back school will be there. john: you even took college courses? you could just not pay? >> professors were more than
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
is simply put, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? that is one of the challenges we took on. it is interesting -- a couple years ago before i was governor this because young woman who wisconsin in a community called milwaukee. milwaukee schools are some of the most challenged in the country. this was a first year teach who was named outstanding teacher of the year. she got noticed about that a week later she got a second notice. do you know what that notice was? she got laid off. they cut funding in education so when you have less money in those situations, even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession. she was one of the first to be laid off. why? under the old system of collective bargains, the last hired is the first fired. we not only changed collective bargaining we changed it so no longer senior or tenure, in our state we hire and fire based on merit rit. [applause] we're the ones who want to go forward. that is about being relevant. sometimes we can see the arguments on the other side. we're the ones who
subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion for transportation needs and $10 billion for infrastructure -- for an infrastructure jobback -- bank. as federal reserve chairman ben bernanke has said many times over the past few years, simply pursuing deep cuts in the short-term will slow the rate of economic growth and bring down revenues and lead to less deficit reduction. we have two paths before us. we can choose a path of austerity and indifference that will limit economic growth and increase inequality or we can choose one of inspiration and inclusion that invests in our country and creates opportunities for everyone. i choose opportunity over austerity an
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
. and partly because having grown up in new york city as i will tell you with a very inadequate education he was not capable of writing a thank you note. so if his wife was unable to do for him and she would almost everything, if she couldn't do for him he didn't do it because his spelling was phonetic german accent spelling. his handwriting can only be described as horrible. so people often want to know how i came to write about thomas nast and it's a story that originated in gretchen school in california, where i was contributing material for an encyclopedia and produced by my visor, and i chose his name off of a list thinking it would be entertaining. and then my what to look for me to about him i couldn't find any and i thought i'm the world's worst graduate student and they should take me out. i called by pfizer and said i don't know what i'm doing. she said let me look. she looked and she said it's fine, it's not you. there is nothing about him. so it turns out that what existed at that time was a biography published in 1904 by albert bigelow paine who is a newspaper writer for childre
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
in education reform. the've taken me around globe. i have seen firsthand the expose of economic growth in places like china, singapore, and brazil. in some of their cities on any given day, you can see dozens skyscrapers. when i return home, the mood is different. different, and worse. americans have the sense that our recovery is fragile. the greatest prosperity in a century will be enjoyed by other people in other lands, and not by our own children. tonight, i am here to tell you that this conclusion is 100% wrong. we potentially find ourselves at the threshold of our nations greatest century. we can, as reagan did, restore the great confidence of american progress and growth and optimism. tonight, as surely as you sit here, the fundamental are aligning in a way. it is there for the taking if we have the courage to grab it. and push the only problem that divide us today. consider the facts. take energy, with our new drilling technology, america will soon have an energy surplus. this is trillions of dollars in new wealth for americans. trillions of dollars. oreign-policy not overly in
you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing revenues appropriately, reforming tax expenditures to reduce they will on the equivalent of% o 7% or 8a year, thee myriad of tax expenditures in the tax code were able to find cuts. the senate budget in achieving additional deficit reduction is a balanced approach that will make us stronger, not weaker, and that's why it is my great hope that we will pass this in a significant way. i thank the chairman. i thank you, madam president. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senators virginia and hawaii for excellent statements and really laying out the framework
not supporting the party, but they also knew there was no access or very limited access to elite higher education, that there was very little electoral representation, that there was extreme poverty, that there was not representation on the police force or in the political parties, they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something to get kill inside their bed and that that was of a threat to them as well. what the party did was articulate politics that not only drew support from more moderate black politics, but also drew support from other nonblack groups in the united states and internationally, and that support was crucial to being able to sustain on self-defense and the revolutionary imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few sort of examples of some of the allies here. this is, um, the young lords apparently, a puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they wanted to run a breakfast program and ended up doing a big takeover of a church in t
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated, we want to lift people up from poverty to put the american dream in reach for everybody. our party just can't hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climb the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children, we'll champion school choice and solutions to lowering the costs of health care. instead of arithmetic, our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will help keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. and as president reagan said, our 80% friend is not our 20% enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful to those who don't agree with 100% of them. finding common ground with voters will be our top priority. so, first, we're goi
guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation and infrastructure necessary to job creation and economic growth and protects the middle class from these large tax increases. the democratic alternative reduces the deficit in a fiscal and responsible way and a balanced way. without causing harm today and without threatening our economic competitiveness for the future and reduces the deficit while meeting our commitment to our seniors, our elderly and to our children. i urge my colleagues to reject the republican budget that threatens our seniors, our middle class and our economic growth and to vote for the democratic alternative that builds on our great strength as a nation. innovative entrepreneurial business sector, skilled rs hard-working middle class, vote for the democratic alternative that will builds on hope, security and opportunity for all americans. the chair: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from wisconsin. mr. ryan: the gentlelady from pennsylvania said that ending medicare as we know it. i got news for you, obamacare ends medicare as we know it. it
government at home and abroad. >> rand paul wants to accomplish the departments of education and congress and epa. >> small detail. >> and the federal reserve and abolish the income tax. the second amendment which does not allow in his opinion for any form of gun control whatsoever. he makes mitt romney look looks michael due dukakis. >> i paint in primary colors. >> these are details. >> they are details i would just as soon ignore. on some of those fronts. but, again, overall, the primary message that he delivers is less government at home and restraint abroad which you know what? the republican party has been reckless over the past decade. we have paid a lot for it with our philosophy. and so i think he's a good symbol like his father. listen. i voted for his father in the republican primary in 2012. did i agree with what he said about 9/11? >> god, i hope not. >> absolutely not. there are a lot of things that rand paul said i think are way out there and i disagree with, but the core issue of small government at home and restrained foreign policy abroad, i will -- >> not a realistic se
for a fun and educational experience. since 1938 the derby has inspired thousands of the region's young people to learn the physics behind gravity racing and the engineering used to design soapbox racers. america's soapbox derby has been called the greatest amateur racing event in the world. and on june 15 it will continue to make history. the derby teaches sportsmanship, hard work and pride of accomplishment and it imbues its young participants with that same spirit of innovation that has long fueled america's greatness. young people who participate in these derbies are often sponsored by community groups, police departments, fire departments and others who want to invest in our country's future and a very direct and meaningful way -- in a very direct and meaningful way. every year i am incredibly proud of my constituents from maryland's fifth district who participate. a number of soapbox derby champions have come from the fifth district, including the 2009 s of the 2007, 2008, and last year. the winners in 2007 and 2008, kasey rader and courtney rail, respectively went on to win the
that relates to energy, about investing in education so we are competitive and number-one, to build and strengthen and sustained at have commitment to our seniors, whether their economic or their health security. in contrast to the ryan bill, which cuts almost $100 billion from $98 billion, from pell grants. $100 billion from pell grants --pet and crack grants grants. and is a job loser in the short and long term. the contrast could not have been different. one, a statement of our values, that is in support of the middle class, the backbone of our democracy, again, honoring the bows of left-handers, the other, a job loser, and ends the medicare guarantee, and makes it more difficult for young people to afford a college education. in,hat is the week we are and now our members will be taking that message home about the contrast in budget desert -- theout observance of the third-year anniversary of the affordable care act and what that means in the lives of american working families and a celebration of the fact that we have a new inspirational leader in rome. mention theot underfundin
an expansion of engineering and science education, talks about reducing the deficit by eliminate willing waste. how concerned should the gop be about mark sanford's ability to win in the palmetto state now? >> i think they should be very concerned. she is a very impressive candidate in her own right. take away who her brother might or might nop not be or is. take away the baggage that mark sanford has, she is an impressive candidate on her own. an important point to make. that being said, it is likely that sanford will have challenges with women voters in a general election. newt gingrich won the primary. >> what are you trying to imply about our state? >> any time we predict what voters can do they go and do the exact opposite. >> especially in south carolina. >> exactly. no question. my point is even with all the things we are talking about, a tough race for sanford, she is such a strong candidate answered does have real baggage to deal w >> katon, you were quoted in politico, it looks to me like governor sanford has a tough hill to climb, not getting 40% have to convince people who didn't v
for themselves and their families when you take away head start that means kids won't be the educational foundation that they need i think politicians should do the right thing all the time. that's it for today. come on back again tomorrow. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show". [♪ theme music ♪] >> hal: very exciting morning. it's hal sparks, of course. how are you? good to see you. and i'm filling in for steph and the mooks as they are referred to commonly on this side of the aisle anyway. but the person i believe that there is actually no -- no pejorative that either fits nor is truly descriptive of is of course, jacki schechner. >> oh aren't you sweet. >> hal: i can think of all sorts of untoward things but of course this is the news jacki schechner. >> yeah, wait until we get to the end of the week and then you can decide what you want to call me? >> all right. >> you want to do the news? >> i do. >> president obama will nomination [ inaudible ]. he served in labor licensing regulation. he has a good history for fighting for the common man, and enjoys huge sup
. they also knew that given there was no or very limited access to the higher education there was little representation and there was not representation on the police force of the fire departmendepartmen t or political parties. they knew they didn't want the young activists who were standing up and doing something and that was a threat to them as well. with the party did was articulate politics that not only choose support from more moderate black politics but also choose support from other non-black in the united states and internationally and that outlet support was crucial to be able to sustain self-defense and the anti-imperialism of the black panther party as a source of power for change. i'm going to run through a few examples of some of the allies here. this is the young party of puerto rican organization that emulated the black panther party in new york after they took over. they ended up having to take over a church in their neighborhood. working with many church members because they couldn't get space to run their breakfast program and it ended up that they got a lot of support
on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much the way all our conversations went. it is not thinking i would be getting christmas cards or anything else from him. i was not as a retired part of it is that got the strong impression when i would run into him that he viewed me as evil because of the gun issue. he had very strong opinions on the. [inaudible] [laughter] i'd found something on the gun issue he disagreed very strongly about and he viewed me as e
were widely denied an education. now, more than eight million students attend afghan schools and more than 40% of them are female. in 2001 afghanistan had 20,000 teachers, all male. today there are 200,000 teachers including 60,000 women. the number of schools in afghanistan has grown from 3400 in 2001 to more than 16,000 today. per capita gdp has grown fourfold since 2001. afghan life expectancy has increased 20 years since then. more than 18 million afghans now have telephone access compared to about one million ten years ago. now these facts do not eliminate the difficulties that we face. they continue insurgency, a neighbor, pakistan that remains a safe haven for insurgents moving across the border. an ineffective and often corrupt central government and other major barriers to stability and to progress. just as it is important for us to be realistic about the challenges that we face in afghanistan, it's also important that we recognize the advances that have an bp made. so that we can reinforce actions that promote success. i just mentioned two here. the first is to continue to w
to the story illustrate a problem with the way people are educated about rain and consent? >> absolutely. i think given the age of the offenders, given the age of the victims, it is so clear that the perpetrators were operating with impuni impunity, that the education about consent needs to begin much earlier, that they believed they were above the law, and that when they were documenting it, they didn't realize that what they were doing is creating evidence in a criminal case. they believed that because the coach had their backs, which suggests that this is a long-standing cultural issue, that absolutely nothing would happen to them. so instead of focusing on the victims' behavior, what we should be focusing on is how do we intervene in this culture that tells boys that they don't have to respect women as humans, and if they sexually humiliate young girls, absolutely nothing will happen to them. if there's anything we can learn, it is the fact that people need to learn from consent is, what stanley impairment is, intervene in a cultural of masculinity. >> speaking about the toxic culture o
Search Results 200 to 249 of about 867 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)